EXCLUSIVE: What you won’t see in FASTER – missing chicken/crash scene & ending that’s in ALL the trailers

EXCLUSIVE: What you won’t see in FASTER – missing chicken/crash scene & ending that’s in ALL the trailers

And now, we take a look at what you WON’T see in FASTER.  First, watch this trailer.

Spoiler warning – the article below will inherently spoil certain aspects of the film, though much of it regards scenes that are not included in the final print.  Read at your own discretion, but please don’t get angry with us if something in here spoils a part of the movie you didn’t want to know about.

These days there’s an ongoing problem with movie trailers, in that more often than not these trailers are showing us scenes that don’t end up in the final print.  Sometimes it’s very subtle, like a half-second shot of a character doing something in a scene that was cut from the final print for time purposes.  But other times there are major and memorable shots in trailers that seem mysteriously absent from the finished film, leaving us to wonder why the studio would tease us with something we’re never going to see on the big screen.  In the case of FASTER, there are some really major trailer moments missing entirely from the movie, making me wonder what exactly happened in the editing room, and more importantly why did it happen.  I’ve pulled screen grabs which you can see below, and provided what I believe to be a possible reason these scenes are not in the final print.  If you’ve seen any trailers of TV spots for FASTER, you’ve undoubtedly seen snippets of a spectacular car crash scene, which is the result of a game of chicken between Dwayne Johnson’s 1970′s Chevelle and Oliver Jackson-Cohen’s silver Ferrari 360.  If we analyze these trailers and clips, we can see the two cars head toward one another, with the Chevelle launching into the air surrounded by sparks.  That scene, ladies and gentlemen, is nowhere in the movie.  This is particularly hard to understand, not just because it’s so prominently features in the advertising campaign, but because it was undoubtedly an expensive sequence to shoot, and most likely a pivotal moment in the film’s finale.  So what happened?  I have a theory at the bottom of this article, which again I must warn you contains spoilers.  In the meantime here are some screengrabs from the trailers and/or TV spots, and what I think is going on in them.

 

In this scene, which appears to be the beginning of the “chicken” standoff, you can see the fresh bullet hole in the back of Johnson’s head from when he was shot by the film’s secret bad guy.  This implies this scene played in order after the Evangelist scene.

.

Johnson is driving toward the Ferrari as shots are being fired back and forth by both men.

.

You see Johnson firing his gun at Oliver Jackson-Cohen…

.

…and Oliver Jackson-Cohen firing his gun back at Johnson.

.

Then the big moment, as Johnson’s Chevelle launches into the sky upon hitting the Ferrari.

 

.

Another shot of the launch.

.

The Chevelle from an undercarriage view.

.

The Ferrari skids out…

 

.

…and crashes into a pole.

.

Johnson gets out for a standoff.

.

He faces off with Oliver Jackson-Cohen.

.

And clearly (this was in the trailer folks) kills him.

.

There’s also a shot in the trailer of Maggie Grace’s character Lily getting out of a yellow car.

.

The camera closes in on her, and she’s holding a gun (not visible in this shot).  Is it possible she’s the one who shoots Oliver Jackson-Cohen?!?  Would be surprising, as they’re very much in love in the movie.

.

Then there’s these last few shots that showed up in the trailers, where several cop cars are following Johnson in the Chevelle.

.

The cop cars close in on him.

.

Close-up shot of Johnson with cops in the background.  He looks tired.  Can we assume they catch him and send him back to jail?

.

So there you go, all of those screenshots you see above are NOT in the final print of the film.  There is no game of chicken, no spectacular crash, just a quiet and somewhat anti-climatic ending.  If you’ve seen the film, then read on, otherwise I’m about to discuss what happens in the end of the movie, and how I think this was an original ending.

Last chance to avoid spoilers…

Okay, here we go.  In the final print of the film, Oliver Jackson-Cohen’s character gets the drop on Johnson after Johnson deals with the Evangelist.  Rather than shoot him, the Cop (Thornton) shows up and shoots Johnson in the back of the head.  It’s established early on in the film that Johnson’s character had a metal plate put in his head.  Oliver’s character leaves the tent, and basically eludes to getting out of the business, leading the audience to believe he’s heading back to Lily and the promise of a normal life.  It’s a happy ending of sorts for that character, and he lives to see another day.  As Cop makes a phone call to his ex saying he’s finished the job, Johnson shoots him from behind, has a few last words with him, then kills him.  He then dumps his brother’s ashes in the lake, and shortly thereafter the movie ends.  So here’s my theory.  I think in the original cut, after Driver disposes of Cop, he meets up with Killer on the road.  As you can see in the first screencap, Driver has the bullet from Cop in the back of his head.  So Driver and Killer do the chicken thing, Driver’s car goes airborn and lands hundreds of feet away.  Each of them get out of their cars, and clearly Killer dies, probably by Driver’s gun.  Then there’s the shot of Maggie Grace getting out of the yellow car, which could be just about anywhere in the film, but I’m guessing it comes either right around the death scene of Killer, or shortly after, as she looks like she’s starting to get emotional in that shot.  As for the cop cars, I think the movie originally ended with the cops catching up to Driver, and him going back to jail, now that his job is finished.  My guess is they screened this with that original ending, and audiences wanted Johnson to get away, and Oliver Jackson-Cohen to live… so they reshot an ending with no chicken (or just cut the chicken scene out altogether), and left out the cops catching up to Driver.  Sound plausible?  I can only hope the alternate ending, or at the very least the chicken scene, will make it to the home video version of FASTER.  It definitely would have made it seem more like an “action” film, but I can also understand how changing those certain aspects would make audiences happier.  Bottom line is this… Hollywood, please stop putting scenes in trailers that aren’t in the finished print.  It’s aggravating, and in this case downright upsetting.  I waited that whole movie to see that spectacular crash, and it never came.  You think I’m the only one who is going to feel that way?  Seriously?  Seriously.  Share your thoughts in the comments below.

.

As two final bits of evidence, check out the first little bit of this B-roll footage, which clearly shows the filming of the crash scene.

And this publicity photo of Maggie Grace holding a gun in front of the yellow car.  Again, this scene is never in the movie, but was clearly shot for the film.

Click on image to see it full-size

FASTER opens November 24, 2010

Be Sociable, Share!

About the Author

Born and raised in Dallas, Mark has been a movie critic since 1994, with reviews featured in print, radio and National TV. In 2001 he started the Entertainment section of the Herorealm website, where he contributed film reviews and celebrity interviews until 2004. After three years of service there, he started Bigfanboy.com, which has become one of the Dallas film community's leading information websites. Bigfanboy hosts several movie screenings in the Texas area, and works closely with film and TV studios and promotional partners to host exciting events and contests. The site also features a variety of rare celebrity and filmmaker interviews, and Bigfanboy.com regularly covers the film festival circuit as well. In addition to Hollywood reporting, Mark has worked for many years as an advertising and sci-fi/comic book artist. Clients have included Lucasfilm Ltd., Topps Trading Cards, The Dallas Mavericks and The Dallas Stars. He currently catalogs rare comic books and movie memorabilia for Heritage Auctions, and runs the Dallas Comic Con and Sci-Fi Expo conventions, but remains an avid moviegoer and cinema buff.